Monday, February 13, 2017

North Korea Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries

CNN map of North Korea missile launch




Maps in the News:  North Korea and the Sea of Japan, or Is It the East Sea?

North Korea tested a reported new ballistic missile on Sunday evening, a violation of a United Nations Security Council resolution banning missile launches by the nation.  News reports state that the missile traveled about 300 miles before landing in the Sea of Japan.

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) includes a large collection maps of the Korean Peninsula, including North and South Korea separately and historically as one nation.  

A map of North Korea is available in the International Historic Maps Collection of the Digital Media Repository.  The map is published in the Russian language in 1912.

The Sea of Japan is also included in maps instructional sessions given by the GRMC as part of the study of place name disputes.  The “Sea of Japan” is the name of the body of water between the Korean Peninsula and the islands of Japan.  The Japanese government supports the use of the name “Sea of Japan.”  The governments of North Korea and South Korea support the use of the name “East Sea” for the same body of water. 

The international governing body for the naming of bodies of water rejected the Korean claim and officially use the name “Sea of Japan.”  However, most maps include both names—usually with “East Sea” listed in parenthesis.  Maps published by the Korean governments, though, list only “East Sea” for the name of the water (above).

The Atlas Collection on the second floor of Bracken Library also includes several resources about the Korean Peninsula.  East Sea in Old Western Maps is an atlas published by the Korean Overseas Information Service in Seoul in 2004 for “The Society for East Sea.”  The book includes historic maps that label the neighboring body of water as the “East Sea” and includes a chapter arguing the historical points for using the name:  “Six libraries’ map collections in this study…” confirm that “appellations like ‘East Sea,’ ‘Oriental Sea,’ ‘Sea of Korea’…had been in much wider use than ‘Sea of Japan’ from the 16th century through the mid-19th.”


Maps from the GRMC are available for circulation for two weeks or longer.  And atlases circulate for 28 days or longer.


Thursday, February 02, 2017

Celebrating Black History Month with Maps





Black History Month:  Map of Moments that Changed the World

On this day in 1865, President Abraham Lincoln signed the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery in the United States.  The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) has created a new custom map in celebration of Black History Month to commemorate the 13th Amendment and other important people and events.  Black History: Moments that Changed the World is a map based on the book 28 Days: Moments in Black History that Changed the World by Charles R. Smith, Jr. featuring illustrations by Shane W. Evans and The Atlas of African-American History by James Ciment.

The map (excerpt above, click to enlarge) features some of the watershed moments in African-American history.  The map identifies the location of the birthplace of Harriet Tubman, a conductor on the Underground Railroad and spy during the Civil War.  Chicago is featured on the map as the hometown of President Barack Obama and Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who opened the first African American-owned hospital in the country.

The GRMC also has custom maps about the Negro League Baseball teams, the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., millionaire businesswoman Madam C.J. Walker, and a map about the life of Sojourner Truth.  The maps are available for circulation from the GRMC and may be used for classroom research and exhibits.


A subject guide identifying African-American cartographic resources is also available from the GRMC.  For more information about using cartographic resources in the study of Black History, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.  

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Immigration Maps in the News



Maps in the News: Mapping United States Immigration

The Ball State University Libraries GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) provides research assistance for students writing papers and presentations.  Staff in the GRMC conduct instructional sessions for professors to introduce students to using cartographic resources as a primary source.  Students (and other researchers) can learn about the vast world of maps, atlases, and other cartographic resources.

Many Web pages feature unique maps that portray geographic trends and depict current world issues in a truly visual format.  One site used by the GRMC for research projects is Metrocosm.  Metrocosm is a collection of maps created by Max Galka, an entrepreneur and computer engineer.  These unique maps provide dynamic depictions of numerous topics.  The latest maps on the site describe the flow of international trade, show election results in 3-D, map the waste management of New York City, and show traffic patterns across the United States.

One of the maps used by the GRMC in recent current events presentations is “Here’s Everyone Who’s Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820: Two Centuries of U.S. Immigration.”  According to the site, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States from 1820 to 2013, and the map shows their migration patterns.  On the map, each dot represents 10,000 people. A timeline at the bottom of the map shows which countries had the most people migrating to the U.S, so users can track events that influenced migration--like the Irish Potato Famine (above, click to enlarge).  The top three countries for each decade and the total number of people migrating are listed in the corner.

Another popular map is “All the World’s Immigration Visualized in One Map.”  This map shows the inflows and outflows of immigration by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015.


For more information about using maps as a visual aid in research and learning, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Holiday Hours at the Ball State University Libraries


The Ball State University Libraries GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) will be closed on Monday, January 16 in honor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.  The GRMC will reopen on Tuesday at 8:00 am.

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Maps of Berlin Available from Ball State University Libraries






Maps in the News:  Berlin

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) on the second floor of Bracken Library houses a collection of over 140,000 maps, atlases, gazetteers, and other cartographic resources.  The GRMC includes historic and modern maps of cities and countries around the world, including Berlin, Germany.

Handy laminated tourist maps of the city are available for circulation from the GRMC, including the National Geographic Destination Map of Berlin (top map above, click to enlarge). The map shows the location of the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedachtniskirche) next to the site of the truck attack at a Christmas market on December 19.

The GRMC also includes historic maps of Berlin from World War II.  The U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS) published city plans of Berlin in 1943.  The middle map above is a map of the district boundaries of Berlin published by the OSS in 1943 based on a provisional map from 1938.  The GRMC also has maps from the War Office in Great Britain dating back to World War II.

The Collection also includes maps that depict the city separately as East Berlin and West Berlin.  The bottom map is East Berlin published in 1972.  The pale red outline identifies the location of the Berlin Wall.  On the legend of the map, the wall is labelled only “State boundary.”  The legend of the map is published in German, Russian, French, and English.  The popular Brandenburg Gate is labelled as “Brandenburger Tor” just along the Berlin Wall.

Maps from the GRMC circulate for two weeks or longer.  For more information about the unique cartographic resources at Ball State University Libraries, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Monday, December 19, 2016

Holiday Hours in the GIS Research and Map Collection


“Yes the library is open over the semester break.”

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) will be open regular hours from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm today, December 19, through December 22.  The GRMC will open at 8:00 am on Friday, December 23 and close at 3:00 pm.

The GRMC will be closed on Monday, December 26, and Tuesday, December 27; it opens for regular hours 8:00 am to 5:00 pm on Wednesday and Thursday.  The GRMC closes again at 3:00 pm on Friday, December 30.  The GRMC will be closed on Monday, January 2, and reopen for regular hours on Tuesday, January 3 at 8:00 am.


University Libraries hours during the semester break are listed here:

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Pearl Harbor Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries



Pearl Harbor 75th Anniversary in Maps

Tomorrow marks 75 years since the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, initiating the U.S. involvement in World War II.  The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) includes a large collection of maps of Pearl Harbor and other important places during the war.

The GRMC includes a large collection of World War II-era Army Map Service maps of strategic cities and other locations around the world that were critical in war planning.  A collection of World War II newspaper maps, World News this Week, are also available in the GRMC.

The map of Pearl Harbor (above, click to enlarge) was published by National Geographic to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the attack and is available for circulation from the GRMC.  The map includes an aerial photograph of Battleship Row and the Navy Yard taken three days after the Japanese attack.  Oil from the sunken and damaged ships can be seen streaming through the harbor.  The map details what happened to each of the battleships on that day, including a description of the 1,100 lives lost on the Arizona.  The verso of the map shows the Pacific Theater of World War II.

Maps from the GRMC circulate for two weeks or longer.  For more information about using cartographic resources, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.