Thursday, November 20, 2014

Ball State University Immersive Learning Project Showcase



Save the Date:  Ball State University Freedom Bus Immersive Learning Project Showcase

The Freedom Bus project began when the Muncie Indiana Transit System (MITS) provided the Martin Luther King, Jr. Dream Team with a retired bus to transform into a mobile civil rights museum.  The mission of the project is to educate and celebrate the civil rights history of East Central Indiana.  The bus is now moving into the next phase of its journey.

The Freedom Bus was given to a group of Ball State University students for an immersive learning project for the fall semester.  The students were responsible for researching the civil rights history of East Central Indiana and creating, building, and installing exhibit prototypes within the bus.  This showcase will allow the community to examine the prototypes and learn about the students’ work.

The Virginia B. Ball Center for Creative Inquiry, the City of Muncie, the Muncie Human Rights Commission, and the Ball State University Center for Peace and Conflict Studies are sponsoring the showcase at the Muncie Boys and Girls Club (1710 South Madison Street) on December 4.  Bus tours will be presented from 7:00 to 8:00 pm, and the presentation runs from 8:00 to 9:00 pm.

For more information about the showcase, please contact the Virginia Ball Center at 765-285-0117 or email the Center.  To attend, please RSVP before November 26.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Ball State University Libraries GIS Day Events



GIS Day Mapping Workshops at Ball State University Libraries

Next week is Geography Awareness Week, and Wednesday, November 19 is National GIS Day.  The Ball State University Libraries and the Ball State University GIS Knowledge Group are hosting GIS mapping workshops to mark the occasion.

The workshops will be held in the GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) on the second floor of Bracken Library (BL 224).  The workshops are open to students, faculty, and staff, and all levels of GIS knowledge—from beginning to advanced—are welcome. 

ArcGIS Online mapping workshop will be from 11:00 to 11:45 a.m. on Wednesday.  Angela Gibson, Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Specialist, will explain the mapping features and how to access them.  Attendees will learn to set up a BSU ArcGIS Online account or class group; add and search for content; use analysis tools; and discover available apps like Business Analyst Online, ArcGIS Pro, or Community Analyst.

Joel Bump, Data Systems manager and Developer for the State of Indiana, will present ArcPad Basics from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. in the GRMC.  This high-level demonstration explains using ArcPad for field inventory.  This class will define an item users can inventory; explain setting up a data file and related form; setting up a basic map for ArcPad; and detail collecting data points and using the data in ArcMap.

Bump will present Advanced ArcPad from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.  This workshop will be more interactive with participants discussing topics and asking questions about alternative data sources, the integration of photographs or related tables, or the use of various hardware options.

For more information about GIS Day, please contact Angela Gibson in the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Monday, November 10, 2014

Native American Heritage Maps Class at Cornerstone Center for the Arts






Celebrating Native American Heritage with Maps

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) will be presenting a class for the community to commemorate Native American Heritage Month.  The class will be held at the Cornerstone Center for the Arts in the second-floor Founders Room on Tuesday, November 11 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

The presentation, Native American Heritage Month:  A Celebration in Maps, will feature maps detailing the history of Native Americans near Muncie, around present-day Indiana, and the United States.  The maps cover topics like the shrinking range of the buffalo, Lenape villages on the White River, and Native American resistance and feature prominent Native Americans like Tecumseh, Sitting Bull, and Sarah Winnemucca.

The Cornerstone Center for the Arts is located at 520 East Main Street in downtown Muncie.  The class is free and open to the public, and free parking is available. 

For more information about the class, visit the Cornerstone Web page or call Carly Acree King, Director of Education and Communication, at 765-281-9503.  Contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Friday, November 07, 2014

Wall Street Journal Cartography Article

The Elvis Atlas: A Journey through Elvis Presley's America, Atlas Collection, Ball State University Libraries

The Wall Street Journal this week featured an article about using paper maps in the digital era, including one showing Elvis' hometown.


Tuesday, November 04, 2014

Indiana Political History Map Available from Ball State University Libraries



Indiana Election Day Cartography:  Whigs, Willkie, and the White House

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) features a special “Map of the Month” for November 2014—a map of Indiana political history (above, click to enlarge).  The map, Whigs, Willkie, and the White House, was created by the GRMC and features the people and places of note in Indiana’s rich political history.  Many of the figures and events in Indiana politics also had national prominence and implications.

The map includes photographs from the Libraries’ Digital Media Repository and the Indiana Historical Society.

A copy of the map is available for use in research and learning from the Libraries’ Cardinal Scholar online repository.  The map may be printed for use in the classroom or other educational and research purposes.

The map exhibit is featured in the front windows of the GRMC on the second floor of Bracken Library. 

Native American Heritage Month Map Exhibit at Ball State University Libraries


Indiana History:  Native American Heritage Month Map Exhibit

November commemorates Native American Heritage Month.  Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) on the second floor of Bracken Library is celebrating the month with a special exhibit.

The Native American Heritage Month exhibit (above, click to enlarge) this year includes maps depicting the history of Native Americans in the area of modern-day Indiana.  Indiana’s Native American Tribes is a map showing the Native American groups that lived in area prior to statehood, including the Lenape (Delaware), the Miami, the Potawatomi, and the Shawnee.

A second map, Tecumseh’s War 1811, is from the Historical Atlas of Native Americans by Ian Barnes published in 2009 and available from the GRMC and the Atlas Collection.  The map shows the locations of Native American villages in the region, including Prophetstown.  This site on the Wabash River is where William Henry Harrison fought the Native Americans in the Battle of Tippecanoe.  The map also identifies the locations of American and British forts, Zane’s Trace, towns, and the probably birthplace of Tecumseh and the site of Tecumseh’s father’s death.

The map, Native American Resistance 1785-1842, identifies areas ceded by the Native Americans, Native American settlements, forts, and battle sites.  Northwest Territories 1800-1818 shows the borders of the original Indiana Territory and the subsequent Indiana, Illinois, and Michigan Territories.  Both of these maps and the photographs of Sitting Bull and other prominent figures are from the Historical Atlas of Native Americans.

Another map in the exhibit shows the location of Native American villages along the White River in Indiana.  Current county lines and towns are shown on the map as points of reference. 

A copy of the exhibit poster is available for use from the Libraries’ Cardinal Scholar repository.  Previous map exhibits are also available from the online repository for use in the classroom or research.

The GRMC has also created cartographic subject guides to assist researchers using geographic materials related to numerous academic fields, and a guide to Native American resources is available from the GRMC Web page.  The guide includes maps and other cartographic resources available from the GRMC and the Atlas Collection in Bracken Library.

For more information about these cartographic resources, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.


Friday, October 31, 2014

The Map as Art: Halloween Cartography


Happy Halloween from Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection

The image above is from the book, The Map as Art: Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography, by Katharine Harmon.  Man Cutting Globe is a lithograph created by Vernon Fisher in 1995.  The book was published by the Princeton Architectural Press in 2009 and is available in the GIS Research and Map Collection on the second floor of Bracken Library.


Thursday, October 30, 2014

GIS Story Maps for Halloween



Halloween Cartography:  ESRI Story Map Celebrity Cemetery Tour

ESRI, the international supplier of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software and applications, created an interactive mapping tool called "Story Maps."  Story Maps “combine interactive maps and multimedia content into elegant user experiences…and make it easy to harness the power of maps to tell stories.”  The maps are created by a diverse community of authors, and one of the latest added to the Story Map Gallery just in time for Halloween is called Where Are the Bodies?

WhereAre the Bodies? Story Map provides locations of celebrity burial sites using Digital Globe satellite imagery.  The celebrities include historical figures, notorious criminals, and great authors like Ernest Hemingway (buried in Ketchum, Idaho), William Shakespeare (buried in Warwickshire, England) and Bram Stoker (London, England).  The Grimm Brothers, authors of spooky fairy tales, are buried in Berlin, Germany.

The map also includes legends of Hollywood:  Marilyn Monroe is buried in Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, California.  Bela Lugosi, best known for his role as “Dracula,” was buried in one of his Dracula capes in Culver City, California.  Actor Marlon Brando had his ashes scattered in Death Valley, California, and in Tahiti, while legendary director Alfred Hitchcock’s ashes were spread over the Pacific Ocean.

Musician Janis Joplin’s ashes were also scattered over the Pacific Ocean.  John Lennon’s ashes were scattered over Central Park in New York, New York.  Buddy Holly is buried in Lubbock, Texas.  Jimi Hendrix is buried in Renton, Washington.  Freddie Mercury was cremated at Kensal Green Cemetery in London, England, but his burial location is unknown.  And the grave site of Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors, at Pere Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, France, is one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions and has attracted vandals since his death in 1971.

This Story Map also includes celebrities with connections to Indiana:  America’s first “Public Enemy Number One,” John Dillinger and author Kurt Vonnegut (both native Hoosiers) are buried in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Indiana native Michael Jackson’s gravesite in Glendale, California is also featured on the map.  And Indiana actor James Dean was buried in Fairmount, Indiana, following his fatal car crash in 1955.

For more information about using story maps, visit the ESRI Web page or contact Angela Gibson, GIS Specialist, in the Ball State University Libraries GIS Research and Map Collection at 765-285-1097. 

Original World War I Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries





Historic World War I Maps Available Online from Ball State University Libraries

The Ball State University Libraries’ Digital Media Repository (DMR) provides online access to a broad range of digitized primary source materials, including artwork, architectural drawings, films and video, oral histories, photographs, publications, and cartographic resources.  The GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) has provided more maps for a new collection available from the DMR—the New York Times War Maps Collection.

The New York Times War Maps are a set of five maps published periodically in the Sunday edition of the newspaper in early 1918.  Each map is newspaper-sized and connects to create a large map of the Western front in France, the Netherlands, Germany, and Belgium during World War I.  The maps cover an area just west of Calais, France, along the coast of the North Sea south to Orleans eastward to Freiburg, Germany, and crossing back northward to near Cologne, Germany.

The maps identify the locations of railways, principal highways, canals, aircraft depots, forts and fortified towns, and naval arsenals.  The battle line as of December 31, 1917, and the furthest advance of the German Army are shown with solid and dashed lines.

For more information about the Digital Media Repository, please contact the Archives and Special Collections at 765-285-5078.  For more information about these or other historic maps, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.